Art Movements Through Photography



** Click the show more button below for more info and links**

Sponsored by Kata

Throughout Photographic History, there have been very different Art Movements, each with its own style and purpose. Through these Movements we find diverse photographic techniques, aesthetics and ideas offered. In this class, we will look at several Art Movements in the history of Photography, the photographers involved in each, and examine the visual style that pervaded each Movement. By studying these Art Movements and the photographers and artists who inspired them we can find a source for our own creativity and ideas for our own photographic work.

Eileen Rafferty’s Work

Homepage


http://www.butterfliesandanvils.com/

Original source

40 thoughts on “Art Movements Through Photography

  • November 30, 2017 at 11:30
    Permalink

    A very informative lecture, one which has always been missing in photography world.
    I was thinking of adding Persian subtitle to it but the public contribution is disabled on this video. How can I do it otherwise?

  • November 30, 2017 at 11:30
    Permalink

    In the stage that you have set, they are just trying sell their products by elevating their selling point. That is not "killing art". Its just that their target customer is a common man. Artists were there when there are brushes, then they embraced pencil as well. I like the seminar, by the way. Thank you

  • November 30, 2017 at 11:30
    Permalink

    otto steinert part ,the first photo not belong to him ,its Peter Keetman`s .also a Subjective photography movment member .

  • November 30, 2017 at 11:30
    Permalink

    The Moholoy-Nagy photo isn't the Eiffel Tower, it's a 1928 photo of the Berlin Radio Tower. Otherwise I enjoyed the presentation.

  • November 30, 2017 at 11:30
    Permalink

    Straight photographer (so call purist), like Ansel Adams, heavily modified their pictures while printing, and Cartier Bresson did sketch some of his pictures, so we could say they were sometimes a like little hypocrite. Still, great masters of photography without a doubt. What I want to say is: don't do things just because some movement say so. Find what actually moves YOU. And use any means to reach your photographic style.

  • November 30, 2017 at 11:30
    Permalink

    Nice lecture..
    For me,to knowing Steichen,P.Stand and A.Stieglitz -at least-separate the Photographers from the camera owners.. 😉 

  • November 30, 2017 at 11:30
    Permalink

    I would love to see a 2 hour presentation in what she was not able to show post-modernism. She was great. 

  • November 30, 2017 at 11:30
    Permalink

    It is boring for the average amateur photographer like me. She was passing many important periods of photography very quickly. Also see was looking tired and lazy.

  • November 30, 2017 at 11:30
    Permalink

    Very interesting lecture. Informative and comprehensive. The guy sitting at the front who insists on practicing photography during the presentation is rather irritating. He should have been told to stop what he was doing.

  • November 30, 2017 at 11:30
    Permalink

    very comprehensive two century history within the limitations of a two hour time frame. Her discussion of the 19th and early 20th century would best have made mention of the Pre-Raphaelites which strongly influenced several of the photographers she featured. Indeed they attempted to replicate this style of painting in their photography.   But this is not meant as criticism of the task she accomplished.      

  • November 30, 2017 at 11:30
    Permalink

    Fantastic video. It gave a perspective of the different movements of photography. It also gives me an understanding of why some photos are made the way they are. Thank you Eilleen.

  • November 30, 2017 at 11:30
    Permalink

    So much of what Eileen references is ripe for debate – sadly YouTube, or anywhere online due to misunderstandings, isn't the place.

  • November 30, 2017 at 11:30
    Permalink

    Art can also be defined as something visceral, something created for the pleasure of making without concern for reception or critique; a personal practice without concern for others.

    A large number of 'artists' (and many of those are the biggest names in the art world) are in fact craftspeople – they make things in such a way that their objects will be coveted and sell.

  • November 30, 2017 at 11:30
    Permalink

    Glad you enjoyed the video. This presentation was a one-part affair, but stay tuned for David Brommer's Real Exposures interview with Eileen Rafferty, which will be released within the week.

  • November 30, 2017 at 11:30
    Permalink

    plz tell me there wil be a part 2 to this…..with her….from where she left off…..this has got to be the best video ever put up by B&H.

  • November 30, 2017 at 11:30
    Permalink

    i have savored n viewed this video over a period of 4 days…..by watching it in bits n parts of arnd 20min everyday…… thank you so much for this one 🙂 i have only another 15min reaming will keep for tmrw !!!

  • November 30, 2017 at 11:30
    Permalink

    Quite an American point of view. And I would not call the f/64 group modernist. Dada, Constructivism, Abstract Photography and the like are clearly Modernism. But f/64?

    Nevertheless: Thanks for sharing and please keep on educating art!

  • November 30, 2017 at 11:30
    Permalink

    another very thought provoking presentation- a huge amount of material and I know I will watch this more than once to increase my knowledge and exposure to differing styles. The timeline I found useful as well as contextualizing the movement in time, helped its social-political roots be more apparent to someone such as myself with a very limited art background. Thanks B&H for producing these videos as well as the creation of the Event Space– it’s appreciated!

  • November 30, 2017 at 11:30
    Permalink

    There are a great number of very competent painters, colourists and draughtsmen (draughtspersons?) who are in no sense artists. Don't confuse the tool with the outcome.

Leave a Reply