Blender 2.69 tutorial – Curve modeling for beginners.

https://i.ytimg.com/vi/uBS2s6SzAN4/hqdefault.jpg



In this tutorial I will be taking you through curve modeling and a few useful techniques used in curve modeling. I’ll admit this is a video I was not completely prepared for so I apologize for any confusion/ inconveniences in advance, I will be more prepared next time. Thanks for watching

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31 thoughts on “Blender 2.69 tutorial – Curve modeling for beginners.

  • November 2, 2017 at 20:43
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    Just a tip I use, Empty Object can contain pictures. I am using two images to build an engine. I actually have four of them but you can use six that way you can see all sides. Just set the opacity to 0.10.

  • November 2, 2017 at 20:43
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    One thing that might make it easier to use the curves is to remove all the little 'hairs'. These are normals, and in the properties tab under Curve Display, you can turn these off. Makes it A LOT easier to focus on what you care about.

    I also found that as I was modelling from the front, a quick rotation of the scene revealed that some of my bezier points were actually at varying Y coordinates. Easily fixed of course by selecting all and hitting S->Y->0.

    There was a lot of this tutorial that I ended up skipping, but some of the things that you pointed out early on made me download a simple tribal tat of my own to get better acquainted with the tool. Your tips really made me enjoy using these curves, where before I considered them a pain in the neck. Thank you!

  • November 2, 2017 at 20:43
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    Mais atrapalhado que eu que nao sei mexer no Blender direito. Poderia ter treinado antes de fazer o tutorial. Vale a intenção, mas poderia ser melhor.

  • November 2, 2017 at 20:43
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    In response to your question at 13mins in: While I'm not sure if anyone mentioned within your comments already but
    in the properties window (N) under the Heading Curve Display
    you can toggle the checkbox for displaying the normal direction(arrows)
    as well as alter their size in the field (Normal Size).

    Thanks for the tutorial on curves.

  • November 2, 2017 at 20:43
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    For those complaining about the video, you don't have to listen to every word he says or watch every second of it. Try skipping or speeding up the video and get the gist of it

  • November 2, 2017 at 20:43
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    Kaela, I am now off youtube until further notice(in terms of tutorials at least), my sound got worse with some pc issues and fixes. Thanks for the feedback 🙂 . Used internal mic for this video and all my other videos, planning on getting an external one. So anyway, might remake it, but then again I'll check if there's no tutorials on it already online.

  • November 2, 2017 at 20:43
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    Ye Gods, this is hard to watch and harder to listen too, please take it down and re-make it, please. Practice, create a simple script, easy to follow steps and with good sound and make it 1080P, then dear sir, you will have a half way decent video.

  • November 2, 2017 at 20:43
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    i done seperaty the holes and than Ctrl + J joined it and now when i click 2D to fill it and extrude it fills only the holes totaluy oposite on what i want. I tried to part them and join with different active selected still dont have it :/ Please help i bet that theres a easy way to do it

  • November 2, 2017 at 20:43
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    Let's say that 90% of time I was using for watching this video was waste of time. Make a new video and practice with a simple figure. A Merry Christmas to you! Jesus loves you.

  • November 2, 2017 at 20:43
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    Convert a .png or .jpg (image) to .svg and import the .svg on Blender and go to Panel BezierCurve and in Geometry set Extrude: 0 to Extrude: 0.1, in Object Mode press ALT + C and select Mesh from Curve/Meta/Surf/Text and ready, your model is ready.
    This mode works good with image with a single color.

  • November 2, 2017 at 20:43
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    Good tutorial, and thanks for doing it. I haven't used curves much, so it was very helpful to see someone use them.

  • November 2, 2017 at 20:43
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    Nice tutorial.

    A tangent is specifically the derivative of the curve at a given point. Think of it as a secant line between two points on the curve, getting closer and closer to each other but never touching. Just touching the curve and isn't sufficient to be tangent. Instead it must relate to the slope at that particular point to be considered a tangent (a byproduct of the previous definition). Hope that clarifies.

  • November 2, 2017 at 20:43
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    you, my friend, are really clear yet to-the point in your blender tutorials. i subscribed 🙂

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