DSLR Light Metering (Matrix, Evaluative, Center weighted, Spot)for Portraits Photography Tutorials



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This video talks about different types of light metering used in your DSLR like Matrix light metering or Evaluative light metering or Spot or center weighted light metering for your correct exposure.

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44 thoughts on “DSLR Light Metering (Matrix, Evaluative, Center weighted, Spot)for Portraits Photography Tutorials

  • February 7, 2021 at 20:47
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    I just started looking at your videos and I enjoy that you are so detail and teaching. That is what I been looking for, someone to teach and explain. Thank You dude continue on. 

  • February 7, 2021 at 20:47
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    Recently bought D3200 camera and i was going through your videos one by one…it was awsome…thank you for clear explanation on each thing…really very helpful.

  • February 7, 2021 at 20:47
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    You said spot metering is best for portraits. Is that just for one person? Should I still use spot metering when I take a picture of three people or should I use matrix metering in case?

  • February 7, 2021 at 20:47
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    Great tutorial…  But just to add on the center metering, some people like to focus on a subject and move the frame to the composition desired.  I think that's the reason why its there on all DSLRs.   

  • February 7, 2021 at 20:47
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    Which meter reading do you recommend for taking photos of Newborns? I got confuse between matrix & spot, they seem somewhat similar.

  • February 7, 2021 at 20:47
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    Aspiring photographer here (obviously). Question: On your 3 examples, are you focusing on the darkest spot on the lamp knob, locking the exposure, then composing the image. Or are you composing, focusing on the middle of the frame and then taking the shot? I've exclusively used spot metering with the first method I mentioned (inexperience), regardless of portrait or landscape, but I will try using matrix on my landscape shots. Thanks again sir!

  • February 7, 2021 at 20:47
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    I don't often read too many comments unless I want to ask a question, I read them to check if has already been asked. Imagine how surprised I am to find your ranting reply to I don't know who! Seriously, ignore people who annoy you and don't get into a slanging match! It's about the photography only! Thanks for the video. I have one bit of advice – never argue with drunks and idiots, they will drag you down to their level and beat you with experience. 🙂

  • February 7, 2021 at 20:47
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    LOL, Evaluative in Canon, Matrix in Canon, and Wide in Sony, maybe that person only has canon and never try other camera. I always shoot center weighted when I shoot flowers close up, because I always put it in the center, beside I always crop it in post processing, what do you think? Should I just use spot metering?

  • February 7, 2021 at 20:47
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    Hi thanks for your videos and tutorials,loved and learning alot from your tutorials,im still a beginner and im using nikon d5200 camera,just want to ask if using the center weighted metering does the camera meter always at the center Even though the my focus point or ring is not in the center or i still need to put my focus point at the center inorder for to meter right? Thanks

  • February 7, 2021 at 20:47
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    your method of teaching photography is perfect. i just got my d5100 and trying to learn photography. so far i:ve learnt a lot from your videos. im mainly interested in portrait indoor and outdoor. could you pls do a video on indoor photography.

  • February 7, 2021 at 20:47
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    thanks bro! this helps and good job explaining the matrix or evaluative metering. on the photo example on the video, did you shoot manual?

  • February 7, 2021 at 20:47
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    i cant help but to see alot of haters.. lolz! but your pritty good at teaching bro!.. keep it up! ahaha

  • February 7, 2021 at 20:47
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    Hi, I just want to know what is "partial metering" and "center weight average" in canon 1000d. I don't have spot and center weight. I'm just wondering if its the same. Thanks and regards!

  • February 7, 2021 at 20:47
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    I have a question, I mainly shoot landscape and they are sunrises and sunsets.. I still do not know which type of metering to use here?

  • February 7, 2021 at 20:47
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    Thank you. I'm gonna have to come back to this video a couple of times but it was really helpful! woop woop.

  • February 7, 2021 at 20:47
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    Thanks Great Video! What is the best metering for indoor events? (Spot) with flash indoors what ISO do you normally choose> (1000?) F Stop (4.5?) and shutter always more then focal length

  • February 7, 2021 at 20:47
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    What if I use spot metering and I have to re-frame my shot once I focus on the eye of my subject, the camera will meter again. Is there a way to set the camera to keep the exposure settings once you focus?

    By the way, nice videos

  • February 7, 2021 at 20:47
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    I enjoyed the detailed video. Most just tell you what metering is but not how it is used for different situations. I would like to know though if you would recommend spot metering on a family portrait..the background would be a bokeh effect using Christmas lights obviously the family would be several feet away from the background. I'm wondering if spot metering would be too restricted of an area for a group of 3 or more people. So what metering do you think would be best?

  • February 7, 2021 at 20:47
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    Hello, if I am shooting in manual mode, do I even need to bother setting the light metering since I will be setting the exposure manually (here exposure I meant iso, aperture and shutter speed)?

  • February 7, 2021 at 20:47
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    Very well explained,it may sound weird but need to know why is it really necessary to use the light metering when the light exposure can be sorted on the software later??
    thanx anyway

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