• Monday , 11 December 2017

JavaScript Promises: Thinking Sync in an Async World

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This talk about JavaScript Promises was delivered by Kerrick Long at the STL Ember.js Meetup on Feb 6, 2014. Slides: https://speakerdeck.com/kerrick/javascript-promises-thinking-sync-in-an-async-world

Original source

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18 Comments

  1. Kbonefan
    September 17, 2017 at 22:20

    Apart from the sound, this was a great explanation!

  2. Eli Duhon
    September 17, 2017 at 22:20

    well done

  3. Juan2003gtr
    September 17, 2017 at 22:20

    incredible video….keep up the good work….

  4. Thiago de Bastos
    September 17, 2017 at 22:20

    Great video, thank you!

  5. Dave Schinkel
    September 17, 2017 at 22:20

    great talk but you need to buy Camtasia and use its tools to get rid of the background noise and to bring your voice up higher. Buy it, it's worth it.

    What did you say at 11:39, "doesn't matter if the promise is fulFilled, you do know have to do attach….????" can you fill in the blank there, it was said quick and hard to hear

    What did you say at 12:55 "if you ever write your own code….?? data"

  6. c00Lify
    September 17, 2017 at 22:20

    Great presentation, clear and concise : )

  7. Grant Herman
    September 17, 2017 at 22:20

    Great job!

  8. Lajos Mészáros
    September 17, 2017 at 22:20

    14:56 – Here, just before the release of ES6 in the june of 2015, there is no Promise.cast(). What shall we do with jQuery now?

  9. Dmitry Tuzenkov
    September 17, 2017 at 22:20

    Terrible noise, and no subtitles at all. But presentation is quite good!

  10. Michael OBrien
    September 17, 2017 at 22:20

    Excellent presentation and the 'white noise' did not bother me.  In fact the layout should be a model for other Youtube videos:  when slides are on the screen, the speaker's head is in a corner and no more than 5% of screen space.

    The examples are clear and mostly 7 lines of code or fewer per slide.

  11. Dagang Wei
    September 17, 2017 at 22:20

    I approach this problem differently https://github.com/weidagang/callbackless-js

  12. Sheldon Kreger
    September 17, 2017 at 22:20

    Great topic, but the background noise on this microphone is almost unbearable. I'll watch anyway, but keep it in mind next time you shoot!

  13. Nils Rasmusson
    September 17, 2017 at 22:20

    Nice explanation, Kerrick – and thanks for taking the time to put this together and present it!

  14. alireza mirian
    September 17, 2017 at 22:20

    Regarding the question at 12:00 :
    From the Promises/A+ specification:
    "then may be called multiple times on the same promise.
    If/when promise is fulfilled, all respective onFulfilled callbacks must execute in the order of their originating calls to then.
    If/when promise is rejected, all respective onRejected callbacks must execute in the order of their originating calls to then."
    here is the link: http://promisesaplus.com/#point-36

  15. mia
    September 17, 2017 at 22:20

    Thank you for this very helpful guide. 
    But I have a question about why should we bind console in the below code:
    getJSON('/comments')
      .then(function(comments){throw new Error('Hello?')})
      .catch(console.error.bind(console))
    What's happening here?
    Sometimes, when I use console.error as a callback , for example , response.on('error', console.error), I won't need a bind. 
    Plus, why can anonymous function that wraps up console.error solve this problem?
    Thanks!

  16. Kris Kowal
    September 17, 2017 at 22:20

    Also, Promise.cast is now Promise.resolve in the standard.

  17. Kris Kowal
    September 17, 2017 at 22:20

    promise.then(fulfilled, rejected); promise.then(fulfilled, rejected); promise.then(fulfilled, rejected); promise.then(fulfilled, rejected)

    Would branch. All of these would run in parallel.

  18. Michael Shen
    September 17, 2017 at 22:20

    要是有字幕就好了。。

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