24 thoughts on “Understanding Maya 3D Piston Tutorial

  • December 10, 2021 at 18:46
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    The piston is set to an angle by default, rather than a straight vertical pose. How do I apply this method with that condition in mind. I hope for a reply ASAP, please and thank you. 

  • December 10, 2021 at 18:46
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    A really helpful and informative tut. Clearly explained, great pacing and didn't leave out any steps. Old version of Maya but all the principles are still current and VERY useful for any project.

  • December 10, 2021 at 18:46
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    Guys I've got a little problem, please help me out. I made some hydraulics for some landing gear, and around one of the hydraulic pistons, such as the one in this tutorial, there is a spring. I think it's called a helix polygon.

    Anyway, I want the spring to squash/stretch and rotate along the hydraulic pistons as they move.
    Is there any reasonable way to constrain them together? Please give a brief explanation.

    Thanx in advance.

  • December 10, 2021 at 18:46
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    thats more hydraulics than a piston. i came across this looking for like an engine piston tutorial.

  • December 10, 2021 at 18:46
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    I found this tutorial very helpful. Thank you very much for your contribution. I would like to add my little discovery:

    I found that I had a problem with the objects making up my piston rotating against my will as well, and I found that if you change the "World Up Vector" to match what you have set for your "Up Vector", this prevents the objects from twisting when you move the piston along the Z axis. (i.e. 0 0 1 for Up Vector, and 0 0 1 for World Up Vector in my case. YMMV)

  • December 10, 2021 at 18:46
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    Those are called "annotations". I don't have Maya in front of me right now, but the way it works is you select an object, then click Create >> Annotation ( I think ). It'll ask for you to type in a name. Hit enter, and it'll create some shape nodes and a locator parented under your object. Look in the attribute editor for other options.

  • December 10, 2021 at 18:46
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    can you please tell me how you added those description arrows i mean the arrow along with name of part of piston

  • December 10, 2021 at 18:46
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    this was my first contact with this program, maya, and you made me wanna learn it. you explained everything so clearly and to the point! very good tutorial!

  • December 10, 2021 at 18:46
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    yeah, actually i have been working with blender for 2 years xD
    just vidit my channel, i posted some videos xD

  • December 10, 2021 at 18:46
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    Hi, I'll have to post a video to explain it better, but here's what I just did: a single bone with an IK handle for the connecting rod, point constrain the rod joint to another joint chain tor rotating the base. Parent the IK handle to your piston. Animated the piston up and down, drive the offset cam rotation with the rod translation.

  • December 10, 2021 at 18:46
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    nice prize xD Ok, i will start collecting money for the next 200 years, then i will be ready to buy maya complete xD

  • December 10, 2021 at 18:46
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    Around $1,800 USD for Maya Complete. You can get the free Personal Learning Edition if you're starting out, or Maya Unlimited for $350 if you're a student.

  • December 10, 2021 at 18:46
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    thank you for your explanation. I have been confused about aim constraint for couple of months till now it's so much clear for me 😀

  • December 10, 2021 at 18:46
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    Generally I'd use parent constraints or point and aim constraints to gang up groups of these sorts of rigs.

  • December 10, 2021 at 18:46
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    Very interresting method, but what if you have a kind of cluster of those suspensions e.g. a mechanik like hood hinges? How would you connect all these systems together?

  • December 10, 2021 at 18:46
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    Absolutely amazing man, throughly enjoyed watching it. By far one of the best tutorials! 5/5 no doubt. Keep 'em coming! 😉

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