Urban Wildlife Photography – Birds of Prey



One of the best spots I’ve found for bird photography!!!!

Bristol is home to some amazing urban wildlife and as a result can be a brilliant place for wildlife photography. But even in a city where opportunities like this are not too uncommon, a spot like this with so many opportunities to photograph birds in flight (and more), has to be made the most of.

Special thanks to Miguel Anton and Toby Pickard for this one.

Toby Pickard:

Instagram (@tobypickardphotography): https://www.instagram.com/tobypickardphotography/
YouTube (Toby Pickard Photography): https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCrDzaa-XJFOT1hHMOYh_fzQ

Miguel Anton:

Instagram (@miguelantonfoto): https://www.instagram.com/miguelantonfoto/
YouTube (miguel anton): https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6qpbdGUT86r7SYPPZSGscA

Mystery link: https://youtu.be/nFYmlQ3_DnY

Original source

42 thoughts on “Urban Wildlife Photography – Birds of Prey

  • August 13, 2021 at 12:23
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    During June, I followed a couple of kestrels and found out they were nesting in an abandonned tower on a beach. I went there every day, several hours a day, so they can tolerate my presence. Of course, the day the 4 juveniles decided to go out of the nest, I was late and missed it. I was watching them when a group of photographers (that's what they called themselves…) went to take pictures near them despite my warnings (less than 1m). Some juveniles didn't move because they were so afraid and they others scattered flying, or trying, and landed harshly on the rocks. I was so pissed of after them while they made me the bad guy because I was jealous of their pictures. I'm sure scared birds must be a nice subject for a picture… The problem was that the tide was rising and I was worried the juveniles couldn't fly back on the tower. I went back the day after that and couldn't find the parents or the 4 juveniles. I had to come back several days to spot the parents and some of the young, but it was way harder to approach them because they were more cautious. I didn't find all of the 4 youngs, but the area is big and they were hiding very easily between the rocks and algae, and as they were growing, they were moving all the time. It was the first time I was so into wildlife photography because it is not my thing (more into seascapes), but it was rewarding till this event. I didn't take good photos like you but I was so happy to be around them, watching them, observing their behaviour… I know that now, I need to invest in a good long lens hoping to live others experiences like this one.

  • August 13, 2021 at 12:23
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    Another great video, Matt. It brought back some great memories of when I lived in Bristol for uni 15 years ago. I was like those onlookers, no idea there were such cool critters so close by. I'm still new to wildlife photography, but like you, I do try to point things out when people see my big lens and ask questions. Anything we can do to inspire people to care about wildlife and the environment is a good thing. Thank you for sharing, both the video and the message. Cheers from Maine, USA. 🙂 Paula

  • August 13, 2021 at 12:23
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    I really agree with your comments on taking the opportunity to educate people about local wildlife. Good for and keep doing it!

  • August 13, 2021 at 12:23
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    Absolutely stunning photos mate! What a privilege that must have been! I fully agree with what you were saying about mop enjoying wildlife first hand, I experienced the same last year watching peregrines at Chichester Cathedral, they were so high up, but I had my long lens on a tripod so would let people look at my screen, and its so nice to give people a little peak into their world in person. Great Video Matt, stunning footage!

  • August 13, 2021 at 12:23
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    and as always a GREAT FILM! I do so look forward to your films(i call them that because i think films are a step up from a video). you are one of the few channels that i look forward to watching and sharing. the quality is fantastic and the content is well worth the time to watch over several time. Well done! this is what I try to aspire to.

  • August 13, 2021 at 12:23
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    fantastic video pal and what an amazing spot to witness that amazing sight of the fledgling kestral chicks.

  • August 13, 2021 at 12:23
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    I'm in Florida, and I only recently saw my first kestrel. I was immensely excited! The shot I got wasn't great, but it'll serve until I get another chance at them.

  • August 13, 2021 at 12:23
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    Wow, that would certainly put a smile on most peoples faces. I've been lucky enough to ring Kestrels this year, a brood of 5, and it's always a thrill. Great video as usual Matt, cheers.

  • August 13, 2021 at 12:23
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    Gets better with each video. You always manage to find something interesting to film and I liked the interaction with the onlookers this time. I guess the location was perfect for that. Look forward to the next one.

  • August 13, 2021 at 12:23
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    That's so AWESOME!!! I wish everyone knew more about the local wildlife. I love this so much!!! Thank you for sharing!!!

  • August 13, 2021 at 12:23
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    Wonderful Matt. Frequented that park for many years, I have relatives in Bristol, well Patchway. Can remember getting my first Bullfinch there as an 8yr old. Looks like I might take a jaunt that way next year. So good to watch, bravo – perfect result as a finale, well done. Si.

  • August 13, 2021 at 12:23
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    Wow, fantastic video, thanks Matt. The shot at 8:22 is stunning.
    Enjoyed an amazing few minutes, close up with a Kestrel on the SW coast path at Bude a couple of weeks back. They truly are the most beautiful birds.

  • August 13, 2021 at 12:23
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    Solid episode, Matt!👍 Awareness message effectively made, especially by venue popularity w/photographers and others. Music tempo spot on, although, IMO, volume at first almost drowned out your comments. Sterling stills, even if shot you had in mind was elusive — next time, am sure your persistence will be rewarded. Glad wind did not victimize your hat.😁
    Smartphone app Google Lens can ID imaged object, like Red Vallerian — in case passersby don’t know offhand. Ever use the app?
    Re: camera angle, do you have a right angle finder in your kit? (Eyepiece accessory w/built-in magnifier , useful.)
    What makes a bird a “bird of prey”? Gulls chomping rabbits (prior vid) birds of prey? How about a robbin plucking/eating worms? Sparow dining on insects? Seed-eating budgie, I get. But otherwise aren’t most birds “birds of prey”? Cheers!

  • August 13, 2021 at 12:23
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    Top draw vlog again! As with a few others I follow on YouTube. You're in the premier League of wildlife photography. Well done Matt👍

  • August 13, 2021 at 12:23
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    Great video and of a bird (at least our local version of it) that I love to photograph. A couple years ago I got to spend several months following the antics of a pair of American Kestrels as they went through courtship, breeding, breeding and more breeding and then finally seeing a very aggressive female rip apart prey that the male brought to her. And then a pause until the day the youngsters (4) fledged and the parent worked like crazy to keep them fed. And finally the day they started to learn to hunt for themselves and they then disappeared from that locations. Likely they had managed to catch all the easy prey and their parents moved them on to another location. For us the American Kestrel is more frequently seen during the winter months but they do breed in our area as I had the pleasure to watch.
    Your monologue on educating the public about the birds is something I have had the pleasure to do on a number of occasions but it can seriously get in the way of bird photography opportunities. Loved your video, I look forward to the next.

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