Blender Tutorial: How to Make an Airplane Part 2/2

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Read the Text Summary: http://www.blenderguru.com/videos/how-to-make-an-airplane-part-2
Finishing off the plane from Part 1, this tutorial gets into the texturing, lighting and rendering.
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40 thoughts on “Blender Tutorial: How to Make an Airplane Part 2/2

  • November 1, 2017 at 20:40
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    Question: The lines between the panels are very thin, but when I draw lines with 1px in Gimp they become rather wide (like on your engine). How do you create a line that's very fine?

  • November 1, 2017 at 20:40
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    Guys you could just layer the blueprint over the UV unwarp and make the opacity like 50% so you know exactly where everything goes, it's pretty handy

  • November 1, 2017 at 20:40
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    38:09 "the glass shader doesn't work for this sort of thing"…. you are very wrong… it dies but you are not using the proper image and if you were you wouldn't even be applying it properly… you need to clock on the world icon add sky texture and import HDRI it can be clouds… the ocean…. whatever you want and of cours by doing what I jus said you dont need to keep the camera in 1 position.. you can move it about as you have an (HDRI) picture with makes the sky look 3D so you can turn the camera up or on either side + (you will need some sort of land unless you are not pointing camera down)

  • November 1, 2017 at 20:40
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    I dont get why did you add the background image as a plane rather than adding it in the compositor

  • November 1, 2017 at 20:40
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    every time i put the decals on the plane i dont see it ….same thing with the windows and doors could some one help m

  • November 1, 2017 at 20:40
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    Remarks on the gray were that the paint is considerably heavy and expensive. Given the public can not see the underside (appearance and logo) when the air or notice it when on the ground they are not painted. Everyone else were doing it except American and the industry may follow their example.

    These areas are also areas where slower air is an advantage to provide lift and prevent the engines from blowing out. (just my thought).

  • November 1, 2017 at 20:40
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    I made a pretttttyy bad nighthawk replica with this 🙂 probs should have chosen an easier plane

  • November 1, 2017 at 20:40
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    when you changed smaples a ~32 you chose the render and not preview selection, to preview u can press ctrl + z …. I can only asssume that you already know that though

  • November 1, 2017 at 20:40
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    Hello ! I found a faster and easier way of making several edges lining up, where you would otherwise have got to press s+x/y/z+0 , the solution is makros ! I could use razer's implemented makro setup, but I'm sure their are many other ways of setting makros up. as basic as it sounds, you make your makro press say s -> y -> 0 . play it once and no latency between the keys. Assign it to any key (preferably a mouse key, if available) and you will have much more fun especially when UV editing ! 😉

  • November 1, 2017 at 20:40
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    It's fun to hear you story-telling when doing something we all know how to do, so you storytell to don't get us bored, lol.

  • November 1, 2017 at 20:40
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    Anyone have any ideas why if I save photoshop windows and doors as a PNG the material is all black and when I use JPG it comes out fine?

  • November 1, 2017 at 20:40
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    Good video. Just to answer a few of your questions:
    1. The wing-engine connector is called an engine pylon
    2. The numers on the planes are registration numbers. They are country specific (America begins with N, Australia with VH, .S. Korea with HL etc),
    3. The silver lips on the engines are because of the anti-ice systems which pump hot air throught them (paint would cook off and impede their efficiency)

  • November 1, 2017 at 20:40
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    What is this bug, when object suddenly disappearing from render? Icon show in render still toggled on. =/

  • November 1, 2017 at 20:40
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    AP, I love your tutorial presentation with all your funny remarks throughout. I am a former pilot and I can help you with some of the nomenclature of the plane's parts.
    The leading edge of the wing is where the deicing material is located on the slats surface which can be deployed to increase lift.
    The engines are held in place by wing pods and covered with nacelles.
    The tail has two parts vertical stabilizer where the rudder is located and a horizontal stabilizer where the elevators are located.
    The tip of the wing is the winglet use to decrease drag.
    The top of the wings where you see lines are the spoilers, flaps, and ailerons that are deployed in flight as needed.
    The turbofan engine nacelles cover the fan at the front which allows cooler air to flow over the hot engine section to reduce noise and increase thrust with the same amount of fuel. 
    I hope this info will help in your next aircraft tutorial. You have a great sense of humor which makes the tutorial fun to watch!!!!!!
    alfonso

  • November 1, 2017 at 20:40
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    The first part was nice – for the second I first have to buy and install Microschrott Windoof and borrow some Photoshops too. ^^ Will be in the next 50 years or so …

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