Creating Curling Waves in Blender | FLIP Fluids

https://i.ytimg.com/vi/SWhPJmfLzNo/hqdefault.jpg



There are many softwares out there dedicated to simulating large realistic bodies of fluids, but is such a feat possible in the free computer graphics software, Blender?

4 months of production, 96 hours of baking, 240 hours of rendering, 15 inconvenient crashes went into the creation of this video.

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Song(s):
Surfs Up! 1 by Jonas Elander
Superior by Silver Maple
Innovations by From Now On
Surfing the Beach 2 by Victor Olsson
Our Jam by Da Tooby

Thanks for watching!

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47 thoughts on “Creating Curling Waves in Blender | FLIP Fluids

  • January 27, 2019 at 02:33
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    A couple of (contradictory, I know) thoughts:
    * Tried combining both horizontal and vertical pushers? In phase — diagonal pusher. Quadrature phase — orbital pusher. Or something in-between — elliptical pusher.
    * Remember the first rule of CG: if at first you don’t succeed — cheat! Give up on physical simulation altogether, and fake it all by hand.

  • January 27, 2019 at 02:33
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    Ohh gosh youtube algo made the final experience of the top shot so noisy, btw i love your videos and amazing blender community ,

  • January 27, 2019 at 02:33
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    I live 3minutes away from the sea, and yeah, those look like real waves, though they look like the ones you can't surf because they crash too close to the seafloor, like when the tide is high here.
    Here in Zarautz at least the good waves are the ones that break further inshore, they break with plenty of water underneath because they are bigger. I would love to see the same thing you did but in a different scale: with the wavemaker being shorter, so that there is only one peak of the wave and breaks to both sides and also I would make it to be more inshore so that big waves can be formed, then break and finally continue their way as surf to the shore.
    All in all this is great!

    Also, I almost forgot to mention this. Putting the wave make further inshore would make something very funny. Depending on the day wave period changes (wind stuff that I don't know), but I do know, that the days the period is low we have the best waves and also every 5 waves or so (this being very variable) there are two or one that are massive, they obviously have to do with a phasing phenomena, I guess it has to do with he velocity of the wind and the wave friction, they behave as such that when they are in sync some waves are way bigger, then they get smaller, and eventually they sop for a minute or so, to begin again. Hope this helps!

  • January 27, 2019 at 02:33
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    Maybe for the sand in the water effect you cause use a smoke cloud sand colored just not let that cloud go above the water

  • January 27, 2019 at 02:33
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    Excellent video, really interesting to understand your approach to test the realism of the simulation. It's gold tips. thank and good luck on your future project !

  • January 27, 2019 at 02:33
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    Thanks for sharing this was awesome. I wonder if ripples is the floor in different areas would effect the wave making it look more choppy and break at different times rather than at the same time, adding to the realness of it. Even a varying grade to the floor so the wave breaks faster on one side as opposed to the other.

  • January 27, 2019 at 02:33
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    So, I'm not sure if this is something you looked into during your research, but I feel like the high friction of sand is also a big contributor to a wave breaking. A sea shore is constantly dragging out and redistributing seawater underground, effectively acting like a long stretch of break pads for approaching waves. Wavepools attempt to simulate this by heavily texturing the pool floor (just google Typhoon Lagoon floor to find endless people complaining about how rough Disney's wave pool floor is). And given that most beaches don't have a steep falloff fifteen-twenty feet off shore (like you were forced to settle on here), I can't help but wonder if your main struggle in generating breaking waves is a lack of friction. Or at least sufficient friction – I don't really know how this plugin addresses physics interactions with surfaces, whether its a simple finicky 0-1 float or a fixed 1-X range you probably have to break or who knows. But I do think messing with and increasing the surface friction of your shoreline will produce even better results

  • January 27, 2019 at 02:33
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    i lived in dekalb for a year and it was hell on earth so i may or may not have scream-laughed when you zoomed in on kaneland high school and called it cornfield land

  • January 27, 2019 at 02:33
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    What is the scale of the final simulation? I did some water sims with the blender fluid stuff five or six years ago and one of the technical limitations at the time was the real world scale, which thankfully I was having to scale up my scenes instead of scale them down, which is what I found that alot of other people had to do, and why people doing flood around building sims all looked like they were doing 5cm tall models.

  • January 27, 2019 at 02:33
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    I think if you get rid of the black spheres (of which I don't understand the point) then it'll look better. But that rendering time is probably what's real problem here.

  • January 27, 2019 at 02:33
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    This is pretty cool! However from an average surfer's point of view this wave is a "close out". You should change the seabed making a spearhead so the middle part of the wave starts breaking before, falling like dominos to each side.

  • January 27, 2019 at 02:33
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    But if you had to, how would you go about making the mist? If you could just throw the idea in short in my head that'd be amazing.

  • January 27, 2019 at 02:33
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    There has to be a way of interpolating particle rotations of two baked simulations. As a gradient between still sea, and then folding waves. Right now you got a tsunami coming down to a short wave.

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