Epson V600 Tutorial – Scanning Photo Prints



A short tutorial on what I have found is the best way to scan your photo prints using an Epson V600 flatbed scanner.

Music: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gdJWZxPW45c&t=212s

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41 thoughts on “Epson V600 Tutorial – Scanning Photo Prints

  • January 21, 2019 at 08:28
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    Looking for tips on using the v600 to scan a mountain of very old B&W photos & what fixes are available upon scanning?

  • January 21, 2019 at 08:28
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    Great video, but I followed exactly your steps, and only 1 of my 2 or 4 images on the bed are getting scanned, the last one I selected , what I am doing wrong ? thanks

  • January 21, 2019 at 08:28
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    Really nice tutorial. Is it pretty much the same with negatives and slides?? Also, can a photo be made from a scan of a negative or slide?
    Love the groovy music too.

  • January 21, 2019 at 08:28
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    I suggest that you select one or more of your marquees and experiment with Color Restoration. I believe that your prints are old and faded. Color restoration does a very good job if you are doing lots of prints. If you just have one print which MUST be carefully restored, then perhaps saving the color corrections for post processing in Photoshop or whatever may suit you better but if you want very much better results on lots of photos without so much time spent, the Color Restoration selector is great. I've already done about 5500 old color and B/W negatives and am now starting a heap of prints for which I do not have negatives. Prints fade more than negatives but I had lots of negatives which needed color restoration.

  • January 21, 2019 at 08:28
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    Wow – this is SO helpful. I have had my scanner for a couple of years now and haven't really used it to scan photos like I need to because I didn't know what settings were best. I had even called Epson once and the support person hadn't a clue. This is the first clear instruction I've seen to help me navigate through this!

  • January 21, 2019 at 08:28
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    I'm not sure if this has been mentioned before but the scan of four images doesn't need manual "marqueeing" Clicking the thumbnails tab next to the Normal tab that you were on shows the images autocropped so you don't need to do it yourself. I'm new at this so I may be wrong but just trying to help.

  • January 21, 2019 at 08:28
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    Thanks David, this is exactly what I was looking for. Great job on this video too, you have a really good instructional style!

  • January 21, 2019 at 08:28
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    If you want to do some post editing like in Photoshop Elements or something, I'd suggest scanning them to TIFF files and then converting to JPG after the editing. TIFFs don't have the compression loss that JPG has.

  • January 21, 2019 at 08:28
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    Nice video – I have ~5000 photos to scan (all sizes). Was thinking of this scanner or the CanoScan 9000F. Then i found the Epson FastFoto 640. What would you recommend for a project like mine? Thanks –

  • January 21, 2019 at 08:28
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    Great video, as someone has already said, much better than the manual. One question – you say in the video that you managed to scan the 4 photos into 4 separate files. I think you did this by clicking a button on the bottom, putting marquees around each photo and then clicking on "all". No matter how many times I do this I get all my pictures in one file. I would be very grateful if you could tell me if I am missing something?

  • January 21, 2019 at 08:28
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    Thank you so much for this. I have a ton of photos that I want to digitize and this is the first tutorial that I found that gives practical advice on how to do multiple images. Very well done!

  • January 21, 2019 at 08:28
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    Unsharp Mask: it's a digital technique to sharpen the edges of images and make them look crisper. Think of pixels as a square – if you have a diagonal line that separates a black area from a white area – the scanner software will interpret (interpolate) the pixels between the fields as a "grey" (it averages the information is sees in that pixel – so if 50% of the image in that pixel is black, and 50% is white – the scanner interprets it as "grey" – the lower the DPI – the more you will see this!) – making your edges look fuzzy. Unsharp mask tries to prevent this from happening – making your images crisp! Good video!!

  • January 21, 2019 at 08:28
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    Thanks David,
    At the risk of being a pest, I have one last question, after which I should be well on my way to scanning our 400 family negatives, Oh Boy!
    Question: When I scan a strip of 35mm negatives each image on the strip is displayed partly in one frame and partly in the next frame over. This happens regardless of where I place the negs in the neg holder. hmm.

    Sincere thanks again David.
    Nostology

  • January 21, 2019 at 08:28
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    Will my 35mm negatives be 35mm pictures when I save them to my computer? How can I set their size to say…5 x 7? Thank you.

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