Finding Your Photography Niche | B&H Event Space



Gain insight on how to use your visual voice to define your niche in photography with UK-based photographer Alan Schaller. From the streets of London to the alleyways of New York, Schaller will share his monochromatic journey to help you find your path in the photographic world.

More from Allan Schaller
– https://www.alanschaller.com/
– https://www.instagram.com/alan_schaller

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44 thoughts on “Finding Your Photography Niche | B&H Event Space

  • July 14, 2020 at 20:20
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    For new photographers: what kind of photography do you gravitate towards? For experienced photographers: what is your photography niche?

  • July 14, 2020 at 20:20
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    6:30 There are good niche photographers in food photography who indeed produce 'ridiculously cool' stuff and specialize in that, David Loftus is not one of them. He doesn't just do food, there are a bunch of photos of interiors, lifestyle and travel photos (none of them are 'ridiculously cool') on his website davidloftus.com
    But I get the point.

  • July 14, 2020 at 20:20
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    newbie – I find myself gearing towards macro photography. I'm fascinated with small details which we tend to ignore or simply just too small to see with naked eyes.
    It's like shooting an entirely different world, a peep thru another dimension…

  • July 14, 2020 at 20:20
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    Nice talk, some good advice, but the photos are cliche , commonplace street photos. Black and white high contrast, instagram friendly but lacking any personal style. The fact that he even admitted he could “take that picture all day long” shows he needs to edit more.

  • July 14, 2020 at 20:20
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    My take: Street, portraits & boudoire/nudes, landscape, documentary, product fotography. I don't need to live from it, but I could.

  • July 14, 2020 at 20:20
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    When it comes to street photography here's the only bit of advise you will ever need and that all artists of any note follow: Take pictures of what YOU find interesting. When you get home delete the stuff that didn't quite work. If you post, post only the best that you think are exceptional. If you come up with 1 out of 100 you're doing quite well. Whether anyone else ever gets it, that doesn't matter. We all have a perspective and if you don't express yours then you're a phony with nothing to contribute. That's it.

  • July 14, 2020 at 20:20
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    Great photographer, hopefully he soon learn how to be a humble person. The more you know the more you realize you
    don’t know enough.

  • July 14, 2020 at 20:20
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    Is 24mm lens for aps-c or full frame camera? Does alan use Full-frame Leica camera with 24mm lens? That's is my always confused.. please correct me. Thanks

  • July 14, 2020 at 20:20
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    I'm a street photographer in New York City and I like to wait for someone to notice me–to look my way–before taking the photo, if they don't put their hand up in protest or tell me not to take the photo then I take it as a consent to do so–I'll smile or nod then take the photo, and most times just move on; sometimes the person wants a business card or to chat for a minute–and yes I do walk into a crowd of people and put my camera to my face alerting people to my presence–those who don't want to be photographed walk away and those who don't mind ignore me. (At this time I'm not doing street photography doing social distancing and staying safe), but I look forward to resuming it again soon.

  • July 14, 2020 at 20:20
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    What do you think about people who say they only take pictures in black and white or only in natural light. Why would an artist limit his or her self to only a specific crayon or a specific color or a specific brush or pen? Kind of like what you said about Hawaii because of all the color. Sometimes the photo requires color, don't you think?

  • July 14, 2020 at 20:20
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    Explanation of the pigeon photo was great. Being a fisherman I can relate to the being there and waiting. But I have to ask, did you really anticipate the pigeon would fly into the pre-visualized scene?

  • July 14, 2020 at 20:20
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    Isn't style more about what and why than technique. And yes you're correct that no one cares about "your work more than you" (my work than me). Very profound statement.

  • July 14, 2020 at 20:20
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    Your comment comparing the camera to the race car is a bit misleading. I don't think you're talking camera brand but more about the camera or lens capabilities. It's kind of like choosing a motorbike made for rode trips versus made for short trips and built for racing.

  • July 14, 2020 at 20:20
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    Totally disagree. shooting and sticking to one style has lead to a stagnant and cliché style if you don't notice that. I look upto Koudelka and Meyerowitz who are prolific and have maintained quality over decades without becoming cliche and dull to the eye.

  • July 14, 2020 at 20:20
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    Magnífico trabajo   ALAN.     Muchas gracias por la conferencia y por hacerla  "en abierto"   -y,  por supuesto,  a BH-.   Cordiales saludos desde España.          NANO.

  • July 14, 2020 at 20:20
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    This guy is very smart and thoughtful. He also sounds well educated, well travelled, knowledgable and perceptive as well. It helps to be able to have the time to be creative and think deeply about what you do. Unfortunately, too many of us have too many distractions in life to allow us the time(or money) to do this to his level. You literally have to live it!

  • July 14, 2020 at 20:20
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    I'm a huge fan of your work, and I got a lot out of this video. Thank you for sharing your philosophy and techniques with us.

  • July 14, 2020 at 20:20
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    I've followed Alan on Instagram for a while now. It's nice to get to know the man, who always makes the effort to respond to comments on his work, a little better.

  • July 14, 2020 at 20:20
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    How come most don't want to be labeled as street photographer … From HCB to Garry W . And I am sure Robert Frank and even Saul Leiter. And nice work great images

  • July 14, 2020 at 20:20
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    Permission to shoot (portray) people in most countries or legal systems is not required at all in public space. Minors may be an exception. You have to be careful with objects of military importance like railway stations or airports. This includes publication, in general (mind minors). So you do not need permission to shoot nor do you need a model release. People may get annoyed – and should be advised to read the law. In my own country their is a safety clause that prohibits publication when the photographer "can assume that a reasonable interest of portrayed person is damaged by publication." With cameras tracking citizens everywhere, face recognition, etc., we have no privacy in public space anymore. It's a free country and you have the right to gather news, etc. Trying to limit that is called censorship and (Western) countries have a long history now to prevent censorship.

  • July 14, 2020 at 20:20
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    Alan, if you miss shots when shooting primes only (I never shot with zooms) then you need a second body.

  • July 14, 2020 at 20:20
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    Alan Schaller is a wonderful photographer, very perceptive and sensitive (to the environment around him). I've been trying to develop my own style of street photographer, but in no way is it anywhere near where he is now. Wonderful tips and messages for me to ponder, and as soon as the lockdown is over in the UK, I'll be out there again. Thank you Alan for re-igniting my passion for street photography!

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