27 thoughts on “How to Get Started in Stock Photography

  • January 22, 2019 at 08:29
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    interesting video. I shoot stock for 11 years.. making full time income from it. I also created similar video like that however quite different in content. Your is very informative.. I find it very informative.. nicely done. Totally agree on all the stuff.

  • January 22, 2019 at 08:29
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    I am new to photography. I wanted to ask when you are clicking pictures as a generalist to post on stock photography. In what situations do I need some sort of release form in order to sell my pictures.

  • January 22, 2019 at 08:29
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    Great explanation of stock photography. Stock photography isn't what it once was, but it still can be a great way to earn an income from.

  • January 22, 2019 at 08:29
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    how to set pricing for the photos? At what price I should sell a photograph. And how to do marketing of the website to find customers?
    Can you help me with pricing and marketing?

  • January 22, 2019 at 08:29
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    Hi Ted, as a fellow collector of photography books, I wonder if you'd be able to make a video on reading photographs. For example, how much time you spend studying a single photo, what do you look for, what do you get out of it, etc… would love your thoughts on this topic.

  • January 22, 2019 at 08:29
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    Is anyone familiar with YellowKorner? If you are what do you think about them? has anyone worked with them? 

  • January 22, 2019 at 08:29
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    That was a great look at Shutterstock and stock photography in general. The other comments are really informative as well.

    Maybe it would be nice to compare agencies? I'm thinking along the lines of comparing the fees charged, number of images held, number sold, and prices sold for. What do you think?

    I know you have Shutterstock as a sponsor, but there are are alternatives.

  • January 22, 2019 at 08:29
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    What if you sell some of your images to a stock photography company, does that then devalue the image if for instance you were to submit it to a gallery? Or do you lose that right all together once you sell it to stock? How does an artist decide about stock imagery vs Gallery photography or are the lines blurred?

  • January 22, 2019 at 08:29
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    I clean windows for a living, and I've found that dishwashing liquid and squeegees being readily available to the public doesn't hurt my business. My training and practice means I can give my customers something they can't do themselves. The type of people who pay for professional photography aren't going to suddenly start taking snapshots with their phones and saying 'That will do.' That's my take. ūüôā
    After all, point and shoot cameras have been around for about thirty years now…

  • January 22, 2019 at 08:29
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    Hey Ted,
    I have 2 questions to participate in next editions of q&a. First one is: Does it really matter the camera you use?( Leaving aside the talent and creativity and so on matters) High quality camera can make any difference, and if so which would it be?  E.g. In painting using fine watercolours can make the difference than using bad ones in terms of quality of brightness and so on.
    Second question: I would like to suggest an episode about night shooting and long time exposure. 
    Thanx.

  • January 22, 2019 at 08:29
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    Stand development … more than just the W5, where to find times, agitation schedules … is there a difference in stand times in 35mm vs. 120? What chemicals to use, where I in Canada, or anyone else outside of the U.S.A. Can get, (shipping chemicals gets weird in these times).

    In a nut shell, "stand development" would be very interesting to me.

    Keep up the great work … later!

  • January 22, 2019 at 08:29
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    Go to a site like Getty and throw in a search term and you'll get thousands upon thousands of images returned. It's a numbers game. It's VERY hard to make any money from stock photography.

  • January 22, 2019 at 08:29
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    Yeah. What's been your journey as a photographer and what is photography to you? What does it mean, facilitate, and inspire? Hope to see it. Love the show ted.

  • January 22, 2019 at 08:29
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    Great topic for a quick vid, Ted. Very informative. Just a couple follow-up questions… Price range? Roughly how much would a photographer expect to be paid per shot per license after all the fees, etc. get taken off the top?

    You mentioned that stock photography can be a good revenue stream. Please quantify this. How is the price determined? Is it set by the agency or negotiated per shot once accepted? Are certain types of shots worth more?

    Thank you again! I really like these short segments.

  • January 22, 2019 at 08:29
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    Marketing Exec РWe need a professional high-impact photograph to sell our wares.  If only we could pay pennies on a dollar for what normally would cost thousands of dollars for a client. Рha, but really these days where its so easy to grab "free" images online the big sellers involve people, with professional lighting and makeup. Of if you just happen to have a Ferrari that you can photograph that would sell. Pics of cats, flowers, landscapes worthless in stock photography land from my experience. (sarcasm, but not really)

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