Deprecated: Function create_function() is deprecated in /var/www/vhosts/eduardoarellano.com/d4mations.com/wp-content/plugins/wp-automatic/wp-automatic.php on line 70
Don't just shoot wide open! Here's Why – Bird Photography Secrets Revealed | D4mations.com
  • Saturday , 24 October 2020

Don't just shoot wide open! Here's Why – Bird Photography Secrets Revealed

Code Canyon



One of the main topics in the comment sections of my bird photography videos has been why I almost always shoot stopped down to F8 when I have a big and expensive F4 lens. So I made this bird photography video to show you exactly why and why you might want to consider it as well for your bird photography!

Let me know in the comments what you think about this approach to bird photography and also how we should name my new helper!

Check out my video on Manual Mode Video for further details on how I use it and how it helps me to be a better bird photographer.

Wondering about exposure? Check this out!

_____________________________________________
Free Ebook – 5 Common Mistakes Almost Every Bird Photographer Makes And How To Avoid Them-
πŸ‘‰ https://aviscapes.com/free-ebook
_____________________________________________
NEW Ebook – How To Attract Amazing Birds-
πŸ‘‰ https://aviscapes.com/attracting-birds/
_____________________________________________
Instagram
πŸ‘‰ https://www.instagram.com/jan_wegener_/
_____________________________________________

Music
––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
Dreams by Joakim Karud https://soundcloud.com/joakimkarud
Creative Commons β€” Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unportedβ€” CC BY-SA 3.0
Free Download / Stream: http://bit.ly/2PhjK3H
Music promoted by Audio Library https://youtu.be/VF9_dCo6JT4

Original source

3d Ocean

Related Posts

47 Comments

  1. S R
    March 11, 2020 at 17:47

    How about Gunner for the blue birds name .. Since your always shooting him..lol

  2. Frameztog
    March 11, 2020 at 17:47

    Great video Jan, loads of good info.

  3. phooesnax
    March 11, 2020 at 17:47

    Great video Jan!

  4. Jane Keehn
    March 11, 2020 at 17:47

    This simple tip has improved my photos instantly! Thank you.

  5. patriqc newman
    March 11, 2020 at 17:47

    Way to big of a rig

  6. Thomas Maughan
    March 11, 2020 at 17:47

    If you are trying to separate a bird from a busy background; such as the bird is in a bush, you need wide aperture to soften everything not-bird. But you lose depth of field (the whole point of this technique). Focus stacking to the rescue but there's quite a bit of luck, and some skill, involved in focus stacking. Several photos in rapid succession adjusting focus. Sometimes I'll just put the camera in fast continuous and manually focus through the sharp point while shooting photos. Then combine the sharp bits together in post-processing. It helps if you are using an internal-focus lens that does not change focal length when focusing.

  7. Thomas Maughan
    March 11, 2020 at 17:47

    A closeup examination of the images would show why not to shoot at f16 at ISO 3200 or higher: Noise! Cameras vary widely in susceptibility to noise. Full frame sensors almost always have considerably less noise for any particular ISO as compared to APS-C or smaller sensors (cellphone!). But even at full frame considerable variation exists; my Nikon D850 sensor seems to have only about half the noise as my D800; which means I can shoot at twice the ISO and still have acceptable quality. Where it matters is of course the size of the finished product. On a web page we see no difference at all up to ISO 1600; but it will show up if you print large or crop tight.

  8. TheOldGord
    March 11, 2020 at 17:47

    Name the bluebird f-stop.

  9. 57strub
    March 11, 2020 at 17:47

    Agree completly.

  10. T-Biscuit69 T-Biscuit69
    March 11, 2020 at 17:47

    helped me so much

  11. Karl
    March 11, 2020 at 17:47

    great info and a sage cure for my wide-open fixation πŸ‘πŸ‘πŸ‘

  12. Hu Ko
    March 11, 2020 at 17:47

    Sehr gut, dankeschΓΆn.

  13. CODER QN
    March 11, 2020 at 17:47

    Wouldn't that flash scare the birds?

  14. Viet
    March 11, 2020 at 17:47

    Thank you for the video, very helpful information

  15. ted brown
    March 11, 2020 at 17:47

    You changed the f-stop but you also changed the ISO, next video show the difference with changing the f-stop but keeping the iso the same.

  16. Wilfred Swain
    March 11, 2020 at 17:47

    Great video ! what make is the 'snood' on the flash please and does it give more reach or just defuse ?

  17. Steve Kunder
    March 11, 2020 at 17:47

    See you are using flash , as higher shutter speeds. Would love to learn how to do this, are you using high speed sync?

  18. Tom Tams
    March 11, 2020 at 17:47

    Hi Jan, from the gloomy UK. I follow your outstanding tutorials, they are simply the best. One I eagerly await is the one using flash, is this tutorial still in the pipeline. Best Regards Tom

  19. Richard Powell
    March 11, 2020 at 17:47

    Thank you! That was really helpful. Does this rule of thumb apply to all lenses? I have the Sony 200-600 5.6 to 6.3.

  20. JR Navickas
    March 11, 2020 at 17:47

    Would the flash really be that beneficial at the distance your perch example was set up? I’d be interested to see examples with and without flash. Max min Distance etc. how to adjust flash after ambient exposure etc

  21. Ion Z
    March 11, 2020 at 17:47

    Why would u spend $10000 on a lens if u don't shoot at the wider aperture …

  22. MARK MALASICS
    March 11, 2020 at 17:47

    Actually, the need to have these super-fast telephoto lenses is non existent with the advent of digital cameras. Simply double your ISO and use a slower, better quality lens. The higher ISO has a degradation on the image, obviously. But so does using a fast telephoto lens. And they are both comparable. So which would you rather do? Spend a few extra thousand on a big-ass lens (unless, of course, you're a show-off) or simply dial in a high ISO? However, I do enjoy the camouflage on the lens…..just in case the Russians are around the corner. LOL

  23. Dave Crissinger
    March 11, 2020 at 17:47

    @Jan Wegener Just found your Channel, very informative! Looking forward to more, keep up the good work! πŸ˜ƒ

  24. Sarajit Sil
    March 11, 2020 at 17:47

    Lovely video Jan! This will help us to come out of the myth to use wide open when shooting wildlife to gain over shutter speed and bokehlicious background. But then we compromise on the main bird itself to get it in reasonable depth of field.

    Thanks for this video. Will be helpful if you can do a video on use of flash in bird photography.

  25. RaySweeting
    March 11, 2020 at 17:47

    Hey Jan great video, is that a battery pack just above the lens to power the flash if so what is it?

  26. Rudimar Griesang
    March 11, 2020 at 17:47

    I saw you use flash, I would like you to explain to us how to use flash in bird photos. By Rudimar from Brasil.

  27. Gary Dietz
    March 11, 2020 at 17:47

    Just found your video, excellent explanation and use of examples

  28. Howie Dunbar
    March 11, 2020 at 17:47

    It's odd that you didn't mention distance from the subject, which has a direct impact on depth of field.

  29. b.lew_photography
    March 11, 2020 at 17:47

    This is such an underrated tip, so many of us come to the conclusion that longer telephoto lenses with wider maximum aperture = better in all scenarios. While there are absolutely scenarios/situations where F/4 or F/2.8 might be great, F/8 really is one of the best "fair weather" apertures to aim for with small subjects. Not only that, but if you have a zoom lens, chances are that wide-open is not the sharpest aperture available, with F/8 usually being the sweet-spot for sharpness.

  30. My Samar Island Adventures
    March 11, 2020 at 17:47

    a good reminder.

  31. brent thompson
    March 11, 2020 at 17:47

    What Beamer is that your using with amazing affect ?

  32. 64BBernard
    March 11, 2020 at 17:47

    What about diffraction at f/11? Cameras with high MP tend to hit diffraction earlier than lower mp cameras. Myself, if I shoot wide-open depends on the background, lens and subject. If I have a busy background, then I'll shoot wide-open in order to blur the area behind the bird, unless the bird is of sufficient distance away from the background.

  33. Russell McCollom
    March 11, 2020 at 17:47

    good info

  34. Keith Dickson
    March 11, 2020 at 17:47

    This is great information. Thanks so much.

  35. KG's Photography
    March 11, 2020 at 17:47

    Great video. There was nothing that came a surprise to me but the way you put it over really reinforced the thought process. Great images too. Cheers Keith

  36. Laurent Dieu
    March 11, 2020 at 17:47

    Many Thanks for sharing with us all your advices.

  37. Karl Alexander
    March 11, 2020 at 17:47

    4.31 crow photobomb! anyway, great video, matey!

  38. dfg297lpopdirk
    March 11, 2020 at 17:47

    great video subscribed

  39. CerealKiller
    March 11, 2020 at 17:47

    Sometimes you just need someone to point out what you already know. I have a Canon 500/4 and shoot wide open all the time, often with a 1.4x TC too.
    I need to get a better beamer too, to substitute for the lack of light here in UK, which is primarily the reason for shooting wide open.
    I need to update my body also, an original 7D it's soooooooooo noisy ☹
    Great video.

  40. pennhillman
    March 11, 2020 at 17:47

    Well explained, thanks…

  41. Swaroopsankar Sivadasan
    March 11, 2020 at 17:47

    Great tip Jan. most of the time I don't go beyond f 7.1 with my Nikkor 200-500 with Nikon D500 to keep my shutter speed decent enough for the action (I usually starts at around 1/500 S) and possibly keep my ISO as low as possible for the given situation.

  42. Pierre Blattner
    March 11, 2020 at 17:47

    I totally agree

  43. Outta Thyme567
    March 11, 2020 at 17:47

    Great! One comment: dof depends on the distance to the subject

  44. Marcella Riggs
    March 11, 2020 at 17:47

    Really enjoyed this…& learnt something too!

  45. Jerry Morgan
    March 11, 2020 at 17:47

    Good tips, I shoot a lot of birds .

  46. Bela Acs
    March 11, 2020 at 17:47

    Great tips. F8 or Sharpy for name of the bird.

  47. If It Moves
    March 11, 2020 at 17:47

    I'd recommend playing around with Photopills DoF calculator, for example it gives a 500mm f4 at 10m a DoF of just 9cm, F8 18cm and f11 26cm.

Leave A Comment

You must be logged in to post a comment.